Drug / Alcohol Detox

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Looking for treatment for yourself or a loved one? The Akua team is here to help. Start your recovery at any of our locations throughout the California Region. Give us a call, our admissions counselors are standing by 24/7! Akua provides alcohol and drug detox programs tailored to your needs. Find a rehab facility near you with Akua Mind & Body. Addiction and Mental Health Services including addiction treatment.

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Drug addiction treatment aims to help addicts stop compulsively seeking and using drugs. Treatment can occur in a variety of settings, take many different forms, and last for varying lengths of time. Because drug addiction is typically a chronic condition characterized by occasional relapses, short-term, one-time treatment is usually not enough. For many, treatment is a long-term process that involves multiple procedures and regular monitoring.

There are a variety of evidence-based approaches to treating addiction. Drug treatment may include behavioral therapy (such as cognitive-behavioral therapy or emergency management), drugs, or a combination of these. The specific type of treatment or combination of treatments depends on the patient's individual needs and often on the type of medication used.

Treatment drugs such as methadone, buprenorphine and naltrexone (including a new long-acting formulation) are available for opioid addicts, nicotine preparations (patches, gum, lozenges and nasal spray) and the drugs varenicline and bupropion are available for tobacco addicts. Disulfiram, acamprosate, and naltrexone are drugs used to treat alcohol addiction,1 which often co-occurs with other drug addictions, including addiction to prescription drugs.

Drug addiction treatment may include medication, behavioral therapy, or a combination of both.

Treatments for prescription drug abuse are usually similar to illicit drugs, affecting the same brain systems. For example, buprenorphine, which is used to treat heroin addiction, can also be used to treat opioid painkiller addiction. Addiction to prescription stimulants, which affect the same brain systems as illicit stimulants like cocaine, can be treated with behavioral therapies, as there are no medications yet to treat addiction to these types of drugs.

Behavioral therapies can help motivate people to participate in drug treatment, offer strategies to manage drug cravings, provide ways to avoid drugs and prevent relapse, and help individuals cope with relapse when it occurs. Behavioral therapies can also help people improve communication, relationship and parenting skills, and family dynamics.

Many treatment programs employ both individual and group therapies. Group therapy can provide social reinforcement and help enforce behavioral contingencies that promote abstinence and a drug-free lifestyle. Some of the more established behavioral therapies, such as B. emergency management and cognitive behavioral therapy, are also being adapted for group settings to improve efficiency and cost-effectiveness. However, particularly in adolescents, there may also be a risk of unintended harmful (or iatrogenic) effects of group treatment – sometimes group members (particularly groups of highly delinquent adolescents) can increase drug use, thereby derailing the purpose of therapy. Trained consultants should therefore be aware of such impacts and monitor them.

Because they work on different aspects of addiction, combinations of behavioral therapies and medications (if available) generally seem to be more effective than either approach alone.

Finally, people addicted to drugs often suffer from other health (e.g. depression, HIV), professional, legal, family and social problems that should be addressed at the same time. The best programs offer a combination of therapies and other services to meet an individual patient's needs. Psychoactive medications such as antidepressants, antianxiety drugs, mood stabilizers, and antipsychotics may be critical to treatment success when patients have coexisting mental disorders such as depression, anxiety disorders (including post-traumatic stress disorder), bipolar disorder, or schizophrenia. In addition, most people with severe addictions abuse multiple drugs and need treatment for all the substances abused. 

Treatment for substance abuse and addiction is administered in many different settings using a variety of behavioral and pharmacological approaches.